“For every time I ask my uncle to have me registered in school his response to me is, continue selling you will soon start school, but I cannot get started despite the huge amount of money I generate from the sale of the doughnut and juices” Alphonso Jalloh, 18, and an elementary school drop-out, who now sells doughnut and juices in wheelbarrow in the Paynesville area, says his uncle with whom he lives forces him into street selling.

Narrated his ordeal to the In Profile Daily Thursday, Jalloh said his uncle, whom he declined to name, told him to sell since he (uncle) never had money to support his education at the time, but has been selling for over seven months to no avail.

“For every time I ask my uncle to have me registered in school, his response to me is, continue selling you will soon start school, but I cannot get started despite the huge amount of money I generate from the sale of the doughnut and juices,” he lamented.

18-year old Jalloh stated that he is disappointed in his uncle for not ensuring that he goes back school, noting that the sort of job he wants him to do at this age cannot help him for life.

The boy, who claimed to be a six grade drop-out from the St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran School in Paynesville, lamented that he agreed with his uncle to engage in street selling, hoping that he would take the responsibility to send him back to school sooner due to the inability of his biological parents to sponsor him. “Poor health forced my father to go out of job so there is no way that he can shoulder the responsibility of educating me, actually I would like to see myself back in school in a not too distance future,” he added.  Jalloh expressed disappointment over his uncle's refusal to put him in school regardless of what he is doing in generating income for the family.

He said though selling for his uncle is not a major problem for him as a young and energetic boy, the fact that his not attending school is his frustration and disappointment. Jalloh expressed fear that his life might be bleak without achieving education, describing it as a big embarrassment to his future.

“I report 750 LD daily from the business. I generate something substantial, but my uncle is still playing blind eye to my quest for education”, he pointed out in a sad mood. According to him, he continuously receives promises from his uncle regarding his school following seven months of pushing wheelbarrow under the sun and rains, but is yet to start school.

Jalloh said his desire as young Liberian from a poor back ground, is to acquire what he described as good education to enable him improve his family livelihood and also contribute to the growth and development of Liberia's recovery drive.